Data Highlights

  • Starting April 2016, the Labor Force Survey (LFS) has adopted the 2013 Master Sample Design which has a sample size of approximately 44,000 households.  It likewise used the population projections based on the 2010 Census of Population and Housing.  Other changes made were the use of the 2012 Philippine Standard Occupational Classification (PSOC) from the previously utilized 2002 Update of the PSOC. 
     
  • The country’s labor force was placed at 44.075 million as shown by the preliminary results of the January 2018 Labor Force Survey of the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA).  This translates to a labor force participation rate (LFPR) of 62.2 percent as the total population of 15 years old and over stood at 70.897 million for the period.  Compared to the same period last year, the labor force increased by 1.97 million (or 4.7%) as against 42.109 million in January 2017 while the household population of 15 years old and over went up by 1.483 million (or 2.1%). Consequently, the LFPR went up by 1.5 percentage points (from 60.7% in 2017).
     
  • The number of employed persons was placed at 41.755 million in January 2018, an increase of 2.4 million (6.12%) from the 39.347 million employed in the same period last year. All regions except Region VII posted an increase in their respective employment led by Region X with 386,000 (20.1%) followed by Region III at 381,000 (9.2%) and Region VIII at 248,000 (15.4%).
     
  • Both the number of full-time (worked 40 hours and over in a week) and part-time (worked for less than 40 hours in a week) rose during the period by 1.050 million (26.552 million vs. 25.503 million) and 1.249 million, respectively.
     
  • All the major sectors contributed to the 2.4 million increase in employment with the agriculture posting an increment of 841,000 (from 10.028 million to 10.870 million), despite the decline in fishing and aquaculture (-130,000).  The industry sector also exhibited an upsurge in employment of 719,000 mainly attributed to the increase in construction (424,000) and manufacturing (269,000).  Only water supply; sewerage, waste management and remediation activities suffered a decrease of 28,000 for the period.  The services sector incurred the highest increase of 847,000, which was predominantly accelerated by growths in wholesale and retail trade, repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles (362,000), transportation and storage (244,000) and the administrative and support service activities (128,000).
     
  • Most occupation groups registered increments in employment led by elementary occupations (1.56 million) followed by plant and machine operators and assemblers (258,000); and skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers (221,00).  The rest of the occupations with reported gains in employment posted increase ranging from 60,000 to about 200,000. Meanwhile, declines were registered in the craft and related trade workers (-225,000) and armed forces occupations and special occupations (-11,000) reporting reductions.
     
  • By class of worker, the number of wage and salary workers went up by 1.063 million at 25.775 million in January 2018, bulk of which worked for private establishments which increased by 1.015 million (5.25%).  Likewise, the number self-employed swelled by 876,000 from 10.706 million in the same period last year.
     
  • Unemployed for the period was placed at 2.320 million or an unemployment rate of 5.3 percent. This was lower by 1.3 percentage points than the rate in the same period last year (6.6%). Among regions, NCR posted the highest unemployment rate of 7.8 percent.  Other regions that registered higher unemployment rates than the national rate were Regions I and IV-A (6.7%), Region VII (5.8%) and Region III (5.4%).
     
  • By demographic characteristics, both sexes and all age groups posted lower numbers of unemployed, with men incurring a decrease of 404,000 and the youth, 15-24 years old a reduction of 215,000.  Meanwhile, almost all classifications by highest grade completed likewise registered diminished numbers of unemployed except for those with no grade completed which posted an increment of 2,000 in January 2018.  Highest decline was observed among those who reached high school of 234,000.  
     
  • Around 7.5 million workers were underemployed or wanted additional hours of work, or to have additional job or a new job with longer working hours in January 2018.  This translates to an underemployment rate of 18.0 percent, higher by 1.7 percentage points than the 16.3 percent rate recorded the previous year.
     
  • The average daily basic pay in July 2017 was pegged at ₱412.92, higher by ₱11.39 than the ₱401.53 rate in July 2016. Workers in activities of extraterritorial organizations and bodies received the highest pay of ₱1,231.74 for the period.  Further, seven of the industries under the services sector registered average daily basic pay of more than P600.00 while only the electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply under the industry sector posted an average daily basic pay of more than P500.00 at P659.23.
     
  • Employment gains were observed in the fourth quarter of 2017 as the labor turnover rate was registered at 1.38 percent resulting from an accession rate of 8.27 percent and a separation rate of 6.88 percent.  This meant that 82 persons out of 1,000 employed were hired during the period while 69 workers out of 1,000 employed were terminated or quit their jobs, hence an addition of 14 persons for every 1,000 employed to the total workforce.
     
  • The Regional Tripartite Wages and Productivity Board (RTWPB) of Region I approved effective January 25, 2018 under Wage Order No. RB 1-19 the following increases in the basic wage rate of workers: P30.00 for non-agriculture (P310.00) and commercial fishing (P310.00); P20.00 for medium non-agriculture establishments (P285.00) and; P13.00 for small establishments (P265.00), micro establishments (P256.00), agriculture plantation (P265.00) and agriculture non-plantation (P256.00).
  • The second tranche of wage increase per Wage Order No. RB-MIMAROPA-08 took effect starting 1 February 2018. Under this wage order, an increase of P10.00 was granted to establishments with 10 workers and more; and P12.00 for establishments with less than 10 workers in MIMAROPA.
     
  • The second tranche of wage increase for Caraga per Wage Order No. RXIII-15 became effective last 14 February 2018. This denotes an increase of P10.00 in the daily minimum wage rates of workers across all industries/sectors in the region.
     
  • The index of compensation per employee at constant 1978 prices in non-agricultural industries was posted at 129.4 for the 3rd quarter of 2017. This is 3.3 index points higher than the 126.1 recorded in the same period last year.
     
  • The country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at constant 2000 prices in the fourth quarter of 2017 grew at 5.1 percent compared to 4.8 percent posted in the same period last year. The Gross National Income (GNI), also increased during the period at 4.7 percent from 4.3 percent registered last year.
     
  • The net inward foreign investments for the 4th quarter of 2017 as reported by the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) increased by   US$2,639 million from the same period last year. This translates to net foreign direct investments recording a gain of US$1,381 million with net foreign portfolio investment also registering a gain of US$1,258 million during the period.
     
  • Data from the National Wages and Productivity Commission (NWPC) on the comparative wages in Asian countries as of 31 January 2018 indicated that Japan’s monthly minimum wage rate was the highest at US$1,584.55-US$2,056.83, followed by South Korea with US$1,449.87 and Taiwan at US$ 1,035.17 monthly. Meanwhile, the Philippines’s monthly minimum wage for Metro Manila range from US$277.32 to US$298.92, while minimum wage earners in China, Vietnam and Cambodia receive monthly wages of US$ 158.06-US$346.16, US$146.52-US$165.49, US$140.00, respectively.
Attachment: