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Annual Poverty Indicators Survey (APIS) July 2002 (Preliminary Results)

Reference Number: 2003-008
Release Date: 08 January 2003

The 2002 APIS is the third in a series of nationwide poverty indicators survey undertaken by the Philippines National Statistics Office (PNSO) designed to provide access and impact indicators that can be used as inputs to the development of an integrated poverty indicator and monitoring system for the assessment of the government programs on poverty alleviation and for the use of policy makers and planners. A total of 38,014 sample households or 92.7 percent were interviewed for the current APIS undertaken last July 2002. The 1998 and 1999 APIS were both conducted in the month of October.

The Minimum Basic Needs (MBN) are the minimum criteria for attaining a decent quality of life, which are the basic needs of a Filipino family for survival, security and empowerment (enabling). Survival needs are the biophysical requirements of the family and the individual to assure life sustenance such as health, food and nutrition, clothing and safe water and sanitation. Security needs are the requirements to protect the family from physical harm like shelter, peace and order/public safety, and income/livelihood. Empowerment or enabling needs, refer to the requirements that facilitate the attainment of survival and protection needs namely basic education and functional literacy, participation in community development, and family and psycho-social care.

 

Minimum Basic Needs (MBN) Indicators

2002

1999

1998

Total Families (‘000)

15,925

14,746

14,371

On Survival

 

 

 

% with access to safe drinking water

80.0

81.4

78.1

% with sanitary toilet

86.1

85.8

80.4

% with electricity

79.0

73.3

72.3

On Security

 

 

 

% with roof made of strong materials

72.2

70.5

62.2

% with outer walls made of strong materials

62.1

68.1

55.9

% with owned house and lot

66.5

71.5

68.3

% who owned house & lot availed through gov’t programa/

5.1

5.9

6.3

% with lands other than residence

21.5

21.4

18.3

% who acquired lands other than residence through CARP b/

11.0

9.1

8.8

% with family head who is gainfully employed

81.2

66.2

86.1

% with member 18 yrs & over who is gainfully employed

93.5

95.0

95.1

On Enabling

 

 

 

% with children 6-12 yrs old

51.9

52.7

52.1

% with children 6-12 yrs old in elementary c/

91.2

91.6

91.1

% with children 13-16 yrs old

36.1

35.8

35.1

% with children 13-16 yrs old in high school d/

77.0

71.5

69.9

% with member involved in at least 1 legitimate People’s Org.

26.9

19.1

15.9

% with children 5-17 yrs old

68.4

69.5

68.9

% with working children 5-17 yrs old e/

12.8

14.7

15.2

 

a/ - % to families with owned house and lot

d/ - % to families with children 13-16 yrs old

b/ - % to families with lands other than residence

e/ - % to families with children 5-17 yrs old

c/ - % to families with children 6-12 yrs old

 
 

For purposes of the report, families are grouped into two income strata, lowest 40 percent refers to the bottom 40 percent of the total families in the income distribution arranged in ascending order. This grouping of families was used as a proxy for those falling below the poverty line. On the other hand, highest 60 percent refers to the upper 60 percent of the total families in the income distribution arranged in ascending order. It is the complement of the bottom 40 percent.

 

HIGHLIGHTS

The percentage of families with access to safe drinking water declined by 1.4 percentage points from 81.4 percent of total families in 1999 to 80.0 percent in 2002. Percentages of families both in the lowest 40 percent and highest 60 percent income groups dropped by 1.3 and 1.4 percentage points respectively in 2002. Families with sanitary toilet increased by 0.3 percentage point to 86.1 percent in 2002 from 85.8 percent in 1999. Those families belonging to the highest 60 percent income group reported a higher rate of increase by 0.9 percentage point (from 93.9 percent in 1999 to 94.8 percent in 2002). About 79.0 percent of total families reported with electricity in their houses in 2002. This was 5.7 percentage points higher than 73.3 percent stated in 1999. Across income strata, the 2002 figure both in the lowest 40 percent and highest 60 percent income group increased by 8.5 and 3.8 percentage points respectively.

The proportion of housing units with strong materials used in the construction of roofs rose by 1.7 percentage points (from 70.5 percent in 1999 to 72.2 percent in 2002). However, housing units with outer walls made of strong materials went down by 6.0 percentage points from 68.1 percent of total families in 1999 to 62.1 percent in 2002. The same observation was noticed for both income groups in the construction of roofs and outer walls.

The percentage of families with owned/ownerlike possession of house and lot fell by 5.0 percentage points (from 71.5 percent in 1999 to 66.5 percent in 2002). The lowest 40 percent income group had a much lower decline of 5.9 percentage points.

About 5.1 percent of total families with owned house/lot availed through government housing or financing program dropped by 0.8 percentage point compared to 5.9 percent registered in 1999. The proportion of families with lands other than residence grew by 0.1 percentage point (from 21.4 percent in 1999 to 21.5 percent in 2002). About 11.0 percent of these families acquired these lands other than residence through CARP, which was 1.9 percentage points higher than 9.1 percent reported in 1999.

The percentage of families with head gainfully employed went up by 15 percentage points (from 66.2 percent in 1999 to 81.2 percent in 2002). Improvement was observed in both lowest 40 percent and highest 60 percent income strata from 57.6 percent and 71.8 percent of total families in 1999 to 85.0 percent and 78.7 percent in 2002 respectively. The proportion of families with employed member 18 years old and over reduced by 1.5 percentage points from 95 percent of total families in 1999 to 93.5 percent in 2002.

Proportion of families with children 6-12 years old went down by 0.8 percentage point (from 52.7 percent in 1999 to 51.9 percent in 2002). About 91.2 percent of these families had their children enrolled in elementary school, which was 0.4 percentage point lower than 91.6 percent in 1999. On the other hand, percentage of families with children 13-16 years old grew by 0.3 percentage points from 35.8 percent in 1999 to 36.1 percent in 2002. Likewise, the percentage of families sending their children in this age bracket to high school went up by 5.5 percentage points from 71.5 percent in 1999 to 77.0 percent in 2002. Rising drop out rates of students could be attributed to the reduction of enrollees from elementary grade to high school as observed in the three rounds of APIS.

Growing empowerment of family was apparent as the percentage of families with at least one member involved in legitimate people’s organization went up by 7.8 percentage points from 19.1 percent in 1999 to 26.9 percent in 2002. Those in the highest 60 percent income group exhibited participation rate of 28.1 percent higher than those in the lowest 40 percent income group of 25.0 percent.

About 68.4 percent of total families in 2002 or 1.1 percentage points lower than 69.5 percent in 1999 were with children 5-17 years old. It is noteworthy to mention that child labor declined by 1.9 percentage points as families with children in these age bracket employed in different jobs or businesses posted 12.8 percent in 2002 from 14.7 percent reported in 1999. The proportion of working children in the lowest 40 percent income group (19.0 percent) was more than double that of the highest 60 percent income group (8.8 percent).

 

(Sgd.) CARMELITA N. ERICTA

Administrator             

 

 

Source:   Income and Employment Statistics Division
                 National Statistics Office
                 Republic of the Philippines

 

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