Fishermen, Farmers and Children remain the poorest basic sectors

Reference No.: 20140704-SS2-01
Release Date: 04 July 2014

The Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) releases its latest report today on the country’s official poverty statistics for the basic sectors for 2012. The PSA report provides the estimates of poverty incidence for 9 of the 14 basic sectors identified in Republic Act 8425, Social Reform and Poverty Alleviation Act using the income and sectoral data from the merged Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) and Labor Force Survey (LFS).

5 of the 9 basic sectors have higher poverty incidence than the general population

Fishermen, farmers and children consistently posted the highest poverty incidences among the nine basic sectors in the Philippines in 2012 at 39.2%, 38.3% and 35.2%, respectively. Also, 5 of the 9 basic sectors consisting of fishermen, farmers, children, self-employed, unpaid family workers and women, have higher poverty incidence than the general population estimated at 25.2% in 2012.

Table 1. Poverty Incidence for Basic Sectors: 
2006, 2009 and 2012
(as of 4 July 2014) 
 
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority
 
a/ Poverty estimates for the basic sectors for 2006 and 2009, which were released on 7 June 2012 were revised based on the following: a) adoption of  the new urban and rural classification in the FIES as defined in the NSCB Resolution No. 9 Series of 2003; and b) use of the 2006-based Consumer Price Index (CPI) in the computation of the food or subsistence thresholds.
b/ Based on the 2012 Full Year Official Poverty Statistics released on 9 December 2013
c/ Considering data available in the Philippine Statistical System, poverty estimates for self-employed and unpaid family workers, which serve as a proxy indicator for informal sector workers have been generated since the June 2012 release of the 2009 Poverty Statistics for the Basic Sectors.
 
Notes:
1/ Basic sectors are not mutually exclusive, i.e., there are overlaps for sectors (women may also be counted as senior citizens, farmers, etc.) 
2/ Income derived from the FIES, which was used for classifying poor or non-poor basic sectors, refer to the total family income and not necessarily the income of the individual in a particular sector. Hence, total income of a family with two family members who are both working, one is a farmer while the other is a fisherman, for example, is divided among the family members to get the per capita income of each member including the farmer. If the per capita income is below the poverty threshold, then all the members of the family are considered poor.
3/ Poverty estimates for the three other basic sectors, i.e., indigenous people, persons with disabilities, and victims of calamities and disasters were not generated as information on these were not available in the merged FIES and LFS, the major data sources for the estimation of poverty statistics for the basic sectors. On the other hand, poverty estimates for the remaining two sectors, i.e., nongovernment organization, and cooperatives are not generated as they are not applicable due to the nature of the sector (i.e., not individuals). 
 
Poverty incidence among employed and unemployed Filipinos registered at 21.9% and 18.7%, respectively, in 2012 
 
 
 
Table 2. Poverty Incidence for Employed and Unemployed Population:
2006, 2009 and 2012
(as of 4 July 2014)
 
 
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority
 
a/ Poverty estimates for the employed and unemployed population for 2006 and 2009, which were released on 7 June 2012 were revised based on the following: a) adoption of the new urban and rural classification in the Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) as defined in the NSCB Resolution No. 9 Series of 2003; and b) use of the 2006-Based Consumer Price Index (CPI) in the computation of the food or subsistence thresholds.
b/ Based on the 2012 Full Year Official Poverty Statistics released on 9 December 2013
 
The PSA (then NSCB) releases poverty estimates for the employed population starting with the June 2012 release of the 2009 Poverty Statistics for the Basic Sectors in response to the need to measure the country’s performance towards meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) target on achieving full and productive employment and decent work, i.e., indicator 1.6 or the proportion of employed people living below the national poverty thresholds. Similarly, poverty incidence for unemployed population was generated for comparison.
 
 
 
 
 
LISA GRACE S. BERSALES
National Statistician
 

 

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