NDHS

Infant Mortality in the Philippines is Higher than Other Southeast Asian Countries

A child born in the Philippines is at greater risk of dying than children born in other Southeastern Asian countries, according to the latest results from the 2003 National Demographic and Health Surveys (NDHS) conducted by the National Statistics Office. In the Philippines for every 1000 births, 29 children will die before their first birthday (infant mortality rate), and 40 will die before age 5 (under-five mortality rate) (Table 1). Although the infant mortality rate in the Philippines has decreased slightly since 1998, it is still high compared to other countries in the region—Vietnam, Brunei, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia.

Many Filipinos Have Misconceptions About Tuberculosis and Leprosy

There is a high overall awareness in the Philippines regarding health issues. The results of the 1998 National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) show that most household respondents say that they watch their nutritional diet, exercise regularly, are aware of the cancer-causing effects of smoking and are familiar with dengue fever and steps effective in its prevention. However, misconceptions about leprosy and tuberculosis abound, with only 21 percent of respondents knowing that leprosy is transmitted by skin and 11 percent by airborne droplets, and only one in six respondents knowing that tuberculosis is caused by a germ or bacteria.

Infant Mortality Rate Down to 29 Deaths Per 1,000 Births (Preliminary Results from the 2003 National Demographic and Health Survey)

Infant mortality rate in the Philippines declined to 29 deaths among children below 1 year old per 1,000 live births during the period 1998-2002. There were 35 deaths per 1,000 live births during the period 1993-1997. Mortality rate among children below 5 years old also declined to 40 deaths per 1,000 live births from 48 deaths per 1,000 live births. These are among the highlights of the preliminary findings from the 2003 National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) conducted by the National Statistics Office in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and ORC Macro.

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